Assessment of Reading

  • Important to be done early in the year to determine how the children feel about themselves as readers, do this same assessment half way through the year and then again at the end of the year.
  • At the end of the year, have children self-report their reading habits one last time, after they are done. Teachers give them 1st and 2nd reports and have them write paragraphs summarizing their change and growth as readers.
  • Regularly assess how children are progressing towards meeting goals and then adjust instruction accordingly

Read Alouds

  • One of the major motivators for children’s desire to read
  • Recently, when students were asked what motivated them to read particular books. The most frequent response was “My Teacher read it to the class”.
  • Reading aloud to children is a simple and research-proven way to motivate children of all ages to become readers.
  • Include both Fact and Fiction

Importance of fiction and nonfiction

  • Different individuals will be interested in different topics, it important to include both throughout reading.
  • By reading from different books, genera’s, fiction and nonfiction teachers are demonstrating to students that all kinds of books are cherished and acceptable in their class.

English Language Learners, how to best instruct them

  • Be sensitive to vocabulary that might not be understood and ask your students to explain what unfamiliar words mean
  • Be sure to include “everyone” books and informational boos with lots of pictures as part of your teacher read aloud
  • When reading becomes easy, record the book, record that reading and let your English language learners listen to that book several times
  • Include some books that reflect the culture of your English Language Learners, if possible
  • Choose books for them that they are able to read independently.
  • Provide them with alphabet and simple picture dictionaries
  • When they demonstrate that they can read some materials, encourage them to take items home and share them with their families, who will be delighted with their progress

How can you involve the community in reading

  • Involve families
  • Send children home with actives they can do with their friends and family members

Ideas for independent reading everyday

  • Allow for at least 20 minutes a day for independent reading, possibly starting with shorter periods of time and increasing it gradually as your children establish the reading habit and look forward to it daily.
  • Allow students to choose several pieces of reading material before the time begins for independent reading.
  • Every few days rotate the crates from table to table so that all the children have access to various books.
  • Allow students to read in various spots around the room
  • Create a quiet and concentrated environment for students to best focus on their reading.
  • Establish and enforce the “No wandering” rule
  • Have a large variety of materials available if your struggling readers are going to profit from this precious time
  • Tell kids: “Pretend you are the teacher and that you are reading the book”
  • Kindergarteners are very motivated when they can read to a stuffed animal or doll.

Where can you get reading materials for your classroom

  • Getting free books from book clubs
  • Ask parents to donate
  • Ask for books from your friends and relatives whose children have out grown them
  • Search at garage sales, thrift stores, and other places when they have awesome sales
  • Check to see if the library will sell or donate used books or magazines
  • Check out if bookstores will give you a good deal on closeout items and see if they would set up a donation basket”
  • Subscribe to Scholastic News, Weekly reader, and Time for Kids.

 

Conferencing with students

  • When gradually increasing individual reading time, circulate around and have whisper conversations with individual children about their books
  • Have them establish a “Self-selected” reading time, then set up a schedule so that you can conference with one-fifth of the students each day,
  • Use this time to monitor your children’s reading, to encourage them in their individual reading interests and help with book selection if needed
  • Think of them as conversations rather than interrogations.
  • Conference starters that can be used to set a positive and encouraging tone

-“Let’s See. What have you got for me today?”

-“Oh good, another book about ocean animals. I had no idea there were so many books about ocean animals!”

-“I cannot wait to see what you bring to share with me next week!”

  • Have conferences be kid-centered conversations. Before beginning model or role-play to help children learn what their job is in the conference.
  • Spend an extra minute or two with the struggling readers

Sharing Materials with Colleagues

  • Rotate book crates with other teachers to keep materials new in multiple rooms
  • Have a library that allows other teachers to check out books and return them & they do the same for you.

Time for Students to Share what they are reading

  • Cover a bulletin board with white paper, and use yearn to divide it into 40 or 50 spaces. Select 40 or 50 spaces. Next, Make some small construction paper rectangles in three colors or use three colors of small sticky notes. Designate colors to stand for various reactions to the books:

-Red=Super: One of the best books I’ve ever read

-Blue=ok: Not the best, but I still enjoyed it

-Yellow=boring: This was a waste of my time.

Encourage students to read as many books as possible on the billboard and share their autographs through the different colored paper. Each week, lead students in a discussion about the reasons for their book evaluations, ask questions that spark conversation.

  • Have a readers chair, in which one or two children do a book talk each day. Each child shoes a favorite book and reads or tells a little about it and tried to “sell” this book to the rest of the class
  • Hold “reading parties” one afternoon every tow or three weeks. Students’ names are pulled from a jar and they form groups of 3 or 4, and each student shares his or her favorite books. Include refreshments; popcorn, lemonade.
  • Schedule weekly sharing time.

 

 

Classroom Application

  • Most of the knowledge from the chapter could be applied to a classroom. But, If I had to pick a specific activity. I would select:
  • Cover a bulletin board with white paper, and use yearn to divide it into 40 or 50 spaces. Select 40 or 50 spaces. Next, Make some small construction paper rectangles in three colors or use three colors of small sticky notes. Designate colors to stand for various reactions to the books:

-Red=Super: One of the best books I’ve ever read

-Blue=ok: Not the best, but I still enjoyed it

-Yellow=boring: This was a waste of my time.

Encourage students to read as many books as possible on the billboard and share their autographs through the different colored paper. Each week, lead students in a discussion about the reasons for their book evaluations, ask questions that spark conversation.

  • I found this to be extremely fun, engaging and applicable.

 

 

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